Nonviolence Training

Materiales en papel

Volver al indice

  • A.F.R.I.K.A. Gruppe, Manual de Guerrilla de la Comunicación, Virus editorial, 2000
  • AGIRRE, Xabier, AJANGIZ, Rafael; IBARRA, Pedro, SÁINZ DE ROZAS, Rafel: La insumisión: un singular ciclo de desobediencia civil, Tecnos, Madrid, 1998.
  • ARENDT, Hannah: Desobediencia civil, en Crisis de la República, Taurus, Madrid, 1973, págs. 67-108.
  • ARIAS, Gonzalo: Proyecto político de la Noviolencia. Nueva Utopía, Madrid, 1995.
  • ARIAS, Gonzalo: El Ejército incruento del Mañana, Nueva Utopía, Madrid, 1995.

Manual para Campañas Noviolentas

El cambio social no sucede solo, este es el resultado del trabajo de gente comprometida luchando por un mundo de justicia y paz. Este trabajo se gesta en grupos o celulas de activistas, en discusiones, en sesiones de entrenamientos, en la reflexion de experiencias previas, en la planificación, en la experiencia y aprendizaje con otros. El prepararnos para nuestro trabajo por la justicia social es vital para su éxito.

Este manual compartelo que gente ya ha desarrollado a partir de contextos diferentes.

A.J. Muste Memorial Institute International Nonviolence Training Fund

This fund gives grants of up to $3,000 for trainings that help people learn how to collectively use the theory and practice of nonviolent action to effectively carry out struggles for social justice. Projects must be located outside the United States or within Native nations in the United States.

Projects eligible for support include:

those which build capacity and leadership among people engaged in nonviolent struggles;

those which prepare participants for specific nonviolent actions or campaigns;

A.J. Muste Memorial Institute - International Nonviolence Training Fund

This fund gives grants of up to $3,000 for trainings that help people learn how to collectively use the theory and practice of nonviolent action to effectively carry out struggles for social justice. Projects must be located outside the United States or within Native nations in the United States.

Projects eligible for support include:

  • those which build capacity and leadership among people engaged in nonviolent struggles;
  • those which prepare participants for specific nonviolent actions or campaigns;

The Women Peacemakers Programe Training of Trainers: 2009 - 2010

Gender lies at the root of war and peace. As a marker of identity, an exploration of gender is becoming increasingly critical in understanding the complexity of violent conflict. In practical terms, too, concrete ways must be found to implement a gender perspective in third-party interventions in armed conflicts.

Who Has Power in a School?

Exercise to help people see that virtually everyone has some power and to convey the basic nonviolent understanding of power – that power comes from the obedience of others, and that there are various kinds of sources of power.

Why do what teacher says?

This exercise is to convey the basic nonviolent understanding of power – that power comes from the obedience of others, and that there are various kinds of sources of power.

Training for what? - it is not all about strategies and tactics

With the new electronic format of The Broken Rifle we want to use the opportunity to also get the WRI network using the forums in our re-developed website. This article will be posted on the WRI forum, we invite people to react to it.

Dealing with gender in training in nonviolence

This article is the result of material published in the Handbook for Nonviolent Campaigns and a session on gender and nonviolence at WRI's International Nonviolence Training Exchange, in Bilbao in October 2008.

It may seem simple and obvious that we want both men and women involved in our struggles against war and injustice. However, if we want to fully utilise people's talents, energy, and insights, we need to apply gender awareness to how we organise ourselves, how we design our campaigns, and how we conduct our trainings for action.

Nonviolence Training for the Campaign to Close the School of the Americas

On November 16, 1989, six Jesuit priests, their co-worker and her teenage daughter were massacred in El Salvador. A U.S. Congressional Task Force verified that those responsible were trained at the U.S. Army School of the Americas (SOA) at Fort Benning, Columbus, Georgia, USA. This is only the most notorious incident in the school's history of providing special training to Latin American military personnel known to have committed atrocities and engaged in torture.

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